Orange Coast College Announces The Blooming Of Its “Corpse Flower”

The “Corpse Flower” is one of the most endangered in the world and its blooming is one of the biggest events of the year for horticulturalists who hear of this plant coming into flower. Those with an interest in horticulture in California now have the chance to view and smell the corpse flower in all its glory as a specimen held by Orange Coast College is about to go into bloom and produce the odor this endangered species that only blooms for the first time after a decade of life.

 

Weighing up to 200 pounds, Amorphophallus titanum has been explained by the Director of Horticulture at Orange Coast College, Joe Stead as originally getting its unique corpse-like odor from the beetles that crawl inside to pollinate the flowers. “Little Dougie” as the “Corpse Flower” has become known is the second specimen from Orange Coast College to bloom, following “Little John’s” flowering in 2014 that brought thousands of visitors to the college for the 24 to 48 hours of blooming.

 

Despite being pollinated by hand at Orange Coast College the odor of rotting flesh has been retained in “Little Dougie” and is thought to be a major attraction for those looking to find out more about the history of this amazing plant; after the “Corpse Flower” has bloomed visiting hours will be extended to the Administrative building to 10 p.m. each night with a $3 donation to the Horticultural Department of the two year school.

 

Orange Coast College has a long history of academic and sporting success dating back to the 1950s when the institution just 40 miles south of Los Angeles saw its first building constructed from a design by Richard Neutra. The college offers a range of two-year courses in the arts and sciences, along with trade based certificates and courses offering a pathway to four-year colleges, such as the University of California and California State University.

 

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